New kernel4 module for RTL8111 based cards

Nothing spectacular but for those of you with the common RTL-8111 motherboard NIC (10/100/1000) this is a very nice addition.

Doing some linux investigating we’ve found a 2.4 kernel module for the RTL8111 series chips, common on motherboards (10/100/1000 nic).

I have a new module file for the following network chips  used on motherboards, it doesn’t build with the kernel so had to be manipulated a little to get it to ‘make’ for kernel4.

RTL8111B/RTL8168B/RTL8111/RTL8168
RTL8111C/RTL8111CP/RTL8111D(L)
RTL8168C/RTL8111DP/RTL8111E
RTL8168E/RTL8111F/RTL8411
RTL8111G/RTL8111GUS/RTL8411B(N)
RTL8118AS

It’s based  on version 1.07, no changes to the driver just modified the make file.
http://www.realtek.com.tw/Downloads/…3&SortByDesc=1

Download this for your Amithlon system.
http://amithlon.snkbitten.com/files/…rtl8111nic.lha

Extract the files to ram: then copy the r1000.o file to your devs: pcidrivers/net/ folder and copy the other three files to your S: directory.

It will overwrite your pci_modules, vendors.txt and vendors_pci.txt files in S: so you may want to back those up. The new ones were updated and should give more useful info as well when doing a pcilist  or pciscan command (much less “unknown device”).

I can remove the Intel Pro 1000 Nic from my system now and use the motherboard built-in Nic.

Kickstart….

I replaced the kickstart in Amithlon with a stock A500/A2000 3.1 kickstart.  The system booted just fine and runs with no issues that I’ve noticed so far.  It looks like only exec is different between the two.  I’m going to experiment with how much the shape.rom can be patched without creating any issues.

Soon, new kernel compiling guide based on Ubuntu

I’m working on a new guide for compiling the kernel using an older Ubuntu distro, though it’s newer than the previous guide using a really old Centos distro.

It seems to be a quicker and easier setup as well and I hope to have it posted/hosted over the weekend.

This doesn’t add anything new though it does make the process easier and hopefully help some start rolling their own kernels.